Meeting # 1 – Self-Appraisal

At the first meeting all studio members were asked to appraise themselves against a set of qualities that may or may not contribute to the make up of an architect. The results are fascinating, particularly the rank order of what Sheffield students think they are good or bad at. Should we be worried that ‘designing buildings’ comes so low, and that the highest ranked qualities are the ‘softer’ ones, or is that just consistent with the terms of the studio?

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2 responses to “Meeting # 1 – Self-Appraisal

  1. Sheffield University Data Specialist

    These results are indeed fascinating and without wanting to delve too deeply I have taken it upon myself to conduct some further analysis…

    1
    Arithmetic Means by Gender – Do males think more highly of themselves? My initial answer to this question, pre-data analysis was ‘yes,’ but the means are surprisingly close together:

    Average Score M = 92.4
    (90 + 78 + 92 + 96 + 104 + 88 + 111.5 + 80 / 8 )
    Average Score F = 91.8
    (99.5 + 95 + 92 + 99 + 93 + 81 + 83 / 7 )

    2
    Statistical Range by Gender – Which Gender Group within Studio#8 are more ‘sure’ of themselves?

    M Variation (Highest to Lowest Score)= 31.5
    F Variation = 18

    The result for the F group are quite clustered spread either side of 90, whereas the range between the M group vary wildly. I can conclude that the F group are more sure of themselves as a gender and that the M group are collectively unstable (however there is a possibility that two or three polarized males are skewing the data).

    Kind Regards,
    University of Sheffield Data Analyst

  2. Similarly, the Bath students represent common results with an emphasis on more practical strengths such as detailing and design. I found this exercise really revealing [on a personal and group level]. I believe this stands us in good stead for being self-critical and more confident in our abilities throughout the project, therefore allowing us to test our theories on praxis.

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